THE OSLO JOB – PT. III/III

Stencils

First of all, let me just say that we pulled this one off. There were so many factors in play during this job and time was probably the one at the top. We didn’t really know anything but the sizes off the walls in the restaurant / bar we were hired to paint. Will the establishment be shut down during the paint job? Will there be enough room to cut our stencils? Will our projected stencils work? Do we have time to fix any stencils that are off? Is there time?

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The answer is, there is never enough time, no matter what you do if you’re doing what you love. We began driving up to Norway in a snowstorm early in the morning and arrived in the afternoon. It turned out that Nydalen Bryggeri & Spiseri was expanding and opening up another floor with a dedicated game / hangout /barsection, and this was the area we were painting. What we didn’t know was that we would be sharing it with a crew of carpenters. The electricians would come on Monday, and so would the lights. We were stuck with two portable construction-lights over the weekend. But something is better than nothing right? We dove right in. We cut the stencils lying down on the floor with workers buzzing around us.

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Before we went to bed around 1 am on day one, we had already finished the first wall. It was hard, since we spent half the day in a car focusing on the snowy road, but it was a massive psychological win, and we needed an estimate on how fast we could get a wall done.

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Since living costs are really high in Norway, we planned on eating “real food” once a day at the hotel breakfast (included with our stay). We stuck with the plan and survived on rye-bread, spreadable cheese and protein-puddings which we brought with us from Sweden. Our work nourished us. That, and perhaps a glass of wine or two before bed.

 

We spent three nights in Oslo and didn’t really see anything but floor, walls, ass-cracks and breakfast. In our short stay we worked a total of 43 hours each, and managed to clean up and pack just after midnight on Sunday evening. The sleep we had was dreamless. Mind non-existent. We were dead as doornails before we even hit the pillow each night. Every six hours we would brush our teeth and pretend we were getting ready for a normal days work, to trick the mind that we hadn’t already just worked for six or twelve hours a minute ago.

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Since I snore once in a blue moon, we turned our single room into a double, using the toilet.

And finally, when the last wall was done, it was worth every single second. A few days after coming home we got the feedback; both client and designer are pleased, everything a-ok. Total win. Below are the walls from our final evening in Nydalen.

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Curious about how we prepared for this job? Here are parts I and II of the Oslo job.

Photos by Therese Jarmo.

 

The Oslo job – PT. I/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping

Before life was as complex as it is right now my sister and I used to paint together under the name Brohemia. Things were going quite well towards the end but as you all know, things happen (good and bad) and we just didn’t have the same time and freedom as we used to. We still did some jobs here and there but not like before. The funny thing is, Brohemia is always there, lurking in the dark like an old friendly demon you catch up with now and then – or actually, it kind of catches you. This time completely off guard.

Our old friend Peter Brobäck who started up addmorecolors.com (and turned it into a goldmine) just appeared out of nowhere, as he always does, with a massive job in hand. And as always, it was too good to pass up. So me and my sister are once again getting the spray cans, razors and markers ready for what will be the biggest job we’ve landed so far. We’re painting four walls, in an old industrial building turned into a restaurant/bar. In Oslo, Norway.

We decided to go with Brohemia. Vi like the style and the sense of humour in the images. I don’t want to put too many guidelines down, but if they could include some beer, industrial workers and humour into the designs I’d be very happy.” – The client
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 Dreamjob! And a very generous paycheck. But with a great paycheck comes great responsibility as Spiderman would say if he ran a business. We began with a moodboard.
My sister and I drew up some sketches over a cup of coffee and we very absolutely buzzing with excitement. We’ve taken lots of inspiration from WW2 propaganda posters in the past (the USSR had some amazing artists didn’t they?) and this time was no exception. This is what our sketches looked like a couple of hours into our coffee.
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After locking down our ideas I digitalized our ideas and sent them off to the agency. A week later we got the feedback. A few minor changes here and there (add local logo etc.) but all in all, we’re good to go. Here are the digitalized sketches.
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Our next step will be the creation of the actual stencils. Since they’re massive, we can’t print them like we used to (the cost of printing would eat up our entire budget) so our plan is to project them onto papers in a large room and trace the images in the correct size with markers. And that’s something I’ll document for the second blog post.
Stay trippy! 😉

Grandma sticks it to the man.

Photography

One of the photos I took of my grandma during the #ArtstreetHbg festival earlier this summer ended up in print again. This time, in the cute little folder about Kulturveckan which kicks off in November. The theme will be “freedom”, and it’s kind of nice to have my grandma in there on page one since she grew up in what was eastern Germany  for some time. In a way, this photo makes me feel like she finally got to stick it to the man, in a weird roundabout way. Graffiti and street art is all about freedom and bending of rules and conventions, so I think this photo was a good choice for representing freedom. And I’m happy for myself to of course. It’s always nice to see your photos end up in print.

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The Tim Timmey interview.

Film

I’ve known Tim for quite some time. We grew up in the same area in the 90’s and were both into skateboarding, rollerblading and streetart. Even if we never really hung out (Tim’s a bit older than me and was always better at the above mentioned activities) I enjoyed being around him when we happened to be in the same spots.

In early 2000 we sometimes bumped into each other at parties of mutual friends. He’s always been there in some weird roundabout way and I’ve always looked up to him – he’s just a cool, playful really nice guy.

When I found out he was going to paint one of the big walls for ArtstreetHbg I was quite excited to be able to watch him paint again and it reminded me about my early teenage years. Tim was the artist I spent the most time documenting and we had some really nice days together, him painting, me shooting him. Below is a short bonusvideo from the second day of the festival of Tim working away on his mural.

Due to timepressure, this interview sadly never got any English subtitles. Sorry ’bout that.

This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

If you find Tim to be just as interesting as I do, give him a follow on his instagram.

The Levi Jacobs interview.

Film

Levi Jacobs is a Dutch illustrator who started out as a graffitiwriter. The anonymity you get when you’re out at night writing graffiti suited him well since he felt a bit insecure about his artwork as a kid, and that his drawings was something he wanted to keep for himself. But at the same time he dreamt about turning his passion for art into a paying job. He kept going and now he’s doing what he loves for a living.

This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

The Spidertag interview.

Film

Spidertag is something of a streetartsuperhero. Covering his identity and leaving nothing but geometrical shapes behind him (he works with neoncables). In real life he is still Spidertag, this guy stays in character 24-7. Here he gives his on view about the true soul of streetart and what bugs him about the mindsets of some people. This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

If you’re interested in Spidertag’s installations, give him a follow on instagram.

Festivalphotography – The golden moments.

Photography, Photoshop

When I documented the ArtstreetHBG streetartfestival I mainly shot film. But sometimes I did actally turn the wheel on my Canon from video to photography and ended up with a few shots I really came to like. These are some of my favourites.