Grandma sticks it to the man.

Photography

One of the photos I took of my grandma during the #ArtstreetHbg festival earlier this summer ended up in print again. This time, in the cute little folder about Kulturveckan which kicks off in November. The theme will be “freedom”, and it’s kind of nice to have my grandma in there on page one since she grew up in what was eastern Germany  for some time. In a way, this photo makes me feel like she finally got to stick it to the man, in a weird roundabout way. Graffiti and street art is all about freedom and bending of rules and conventions, so I think this photo was a good choice for representing freedom. And I’m happy for myself to of course. It’s always nice to see your photos end up in print.

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The Passagefestival VHS-montage.

Film

During August 1-6 I spent most of my days and nights living in the spectacle called PASSAGE. Performing acts from all around the world took the streets of Helsingborg and Helsingör, and made them their stage for a week. I was hired to document the events in Helsingborg, put the footage on a drive and send it over to Denmark for editing.

So this is not an official video in any way – I made this for me. I got so many great shots (I have over 50 hours of material) and I couldn’t help myself from making a little montage with some of it. Recently I also got a hold of Red Giant’s Universe for After Effects and that comes with the most diverse VHS-plugin I’ve seen so far.

If you know me a bit, you know I love anything out of the 80’s. I grew up with VHS-casettes and I still remember editing my first movies with an old Panasonic camera and a VHS-player. It’s not for everyone, and some people might wonder why you would take perfectly fine images in vibrant colours, and drag it through the analog mud. Well, because it’s an art form, it’s nostalgia, and just as unexpected and glitchy as half-improvised acts on the streets. This is the Passage VHS montage.

Music used: Hogan Grip – “Stance gives you balance”

If you have any questions about the acts feel free to ask and I’ll point you in the right direction. And if you don’t like my montage – have a look at some cleaner photos from the event here.

The Tim Timmey interview.

Film

I’ve known Tim for quite some time. We grew up in the same area in the 90’s and were both into skateboarding, rollerblading and streetart. Even if we never really hung out (Tim’s a bit older than me and was always better at the above mentioned activities) I enjoyed being around him when we happened to be in the same spots.

In early 2000 we sometimes bumped into each other at parties of mutual friends. He’s always been there in some weird roundabout way and I’ve always looked up to him – he’s just a cool, playful really nice guy.

When I found out he was going to paint one of the big walls for ArtstreetHbg I was quite excited to be able to watch him paint again and it reminded me about my early teenage years. Tim was the artist I spent the most time documenting and we had some really nice days together, him painting, me shooting him. Below is a short bonusvideo from the second day of the festival of Tim working away on his mural.

Due to timepressure, this interview sadly never got any English subtitles. Sorry ’bout that.

This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

If you find Tim to be just as interesting as I do, give him a follow on his instagram.

The Levi Jacobs interview.

Film

Levi Jacobs is a Dutch illustrator who started out as a graffitiwriter. The anonymity you get when you’re out at night writing graffiti suited him well since he felt a bit insecure about his artwork as a kid, and that his drawings was something he wanted to keep for himself. But at the same time he dreamt about turning his passion for art into a paying job. He kept going and now he’s doing what he loves for a living.

This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

The Spidertag interview.

Film

Spidertag is something of a streetartsuperhero. Covering his identity and leaving nothing but geometrical shapes behind him (he works with neoncables). In real life he is still Spidertag, this guy stays in character 24-7. Here he gives his on view about the true soul of streetart and what bugs him about the mindsets of some people. This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

If you’re interested in Spidertag’s installations, give him a follow on instagram.

Festivalphotography – The golden moments.

Photography, Photoshop

When I documented the ArtstreetHBG streetartfestival I mainly shot film. But sometimes I did actally turn the wheel on my Canon from video to photography and ended up with a few shots I really came to like. These are some of my favourites.

The Ilse Weisfelt interview. 

Film

Ilse Weisfelt is a Dutch illustrator who also paints massive murals since her graphic shapes and clean style works well on a large scale. This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here

How I set up the Jimmy Skize interview.

DIY-builds and hacks, Film

This interview was made for the municipality of Helsingborg and their streetart festival “ArtstreetHBG”.

Jimmy Skize is a graffiti-veteran who fell in love with graffiti in when the documentary Style Wars came out. He’s been involved in the art form ever since. This means he was painting when I still walked around in nappies. The interview is in Swedish and sadly I never got around to subtitle it. I’ve got four more interviews like this coming up and three of them will be in English.

So how did I set this up?

  • Canon 700D
  • Canon compact video camera
  • Redhead 800W Cinelight
  • RØDE videomic pro
  • Vintage construction-light
  • DIY cameraslider

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I had one camera on each side of my subject; one close up and one a bit further away. I positioned myself in the middle of these to make sure the subject wasn’t looking into any of the cameras. I used the construction-light behind my subject to separate him from the background a bit, and then I went for a Rembrandt-lighting with my 800w (45 degree angles from the subject X, Y, Z until the little triangle appears under the eye of the shaded half of the face).

I kept the interview kind of loose, like a conversation, but where I mainly nodded and smiled a lot instead of answering (since I cut my part of the chat out completely). I knew I was going to do these interviews, so during the festival I made sure I had some footage of each artist to edit into the interview. Also, I usually try to cut between cameras when I edit as my subject blinks. The closer camera is good to use for a bit of impact when it gets a bit more emotional or personal.

Since there would be a difference in picture quality using two different cameras, I planned to make the footage of the lesser camera black and white and add a vintage feel to it. That’s why I brought my old Super-8 camera to the studio and created a little intro for these interviews. It motivates the black and white, cropped, vintage footage a bit more. I used my slider and stabilized the footage with Premieres Warp Stabilizer and quite easily masked the lens where the text appears.

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The Super-8 camera (a RICOH SUPER-8) was never used for anything else than looking fly in the intro and to justify the look of the Canon compact videocamera.

Finally I took some portraits with my DSLR before letting my subject go since I had everything set up. These photos where later used as cover images for the videos, and for the bio-page of each artist.

Each interview went on for 25 minutes and was edited down to about 4 minutes. The intro was used in every interview and all I had to do was to change the name in the end for each artist.

Coming up during next week are: Ilse Weisfelt, Tim Timmey, Levi Jacobs and Spidertag.

 

 

7 days of streetart in under 7 minutes.

Film, Photography

This summer I’ve been working for Helsingborg documenting the graffitifestival “ArtstreetHBG” and street-theathre festival “Passage”. It’s been hectic and busy with full days of filming and late nights of editing video and photos. But now it’s all calming down a bit and I’ll be posting some of my latest stuff here. Here’s a video that sums up the graffitifestival quite well. If you’re interested in the other media I’ve produced for this festival it can be found here.