The Neural Networks Project – A documentation of binaural soundcapture & immersive theatre.

Audio, DIY-builds and hacks, Film, Projectionmapping

I’m currently taking a six month long course at Malmö Univerity called Experimental Mediaproduction. A week ago me and my group performed the outcome of two weeks hard work. This documentary about the project explains it way better than I do, and I’m sure watching beats reading in this case. I must add that this probably is my favourite project I’ve been involved in since starting my studies in Malmö. If you make it to the end – let me know!

Seamless follow focus gears.

Film

A while back I decided to look for followfocus gear rings for my vintage Kiev 16-U lenses. I bought the complete trio of these lenses for my BMPCC and they look great. But the lenses are quite small and since I’m using them for film I need to be able to pull focus in a handy way.

The cheap “universal” gearbelts aren’t seamless and the Kiev-lens turn at least 360° so they wouldn’t work. Also, these tend to slip a bit so I’ve never been fond of them. There are some cheap rings you can tighten with a screw, but they don’t go below 50mm and my lenses are 44/45 mm in diameter.

So I started to look for specialists. There are some options when it comes to getting custom-made rings which are made to fit the diameter of whatever lens you may have, but most of them start at about $50 a pop. Getting one wouldn’t work because of the different diameters on the Kiev’s, and I wasn’t keen on spending the same amount of money on custom gears as I did on the entire lens set.

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The Tair-41 and Vega 7-1 turned into cinelenses.

Luckily I found the FLEX gears on eBay and asked if they could create some fitting my lenses. It wasn’t a problem. Each gear is about $8 and the quality is good.

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The dealer is very welcoming and polite and it didn’t take very long before I received my package. They even added an extra ring for free. Couldn’t be happier.

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The gears have industry standard 32 pitch (mod 0.8) and work fine with most follow focus systems. All in all a great find which makes my life a bit easier.

Shooting Sins – The work behind the camera.

Film

Sins In Vain is a melodic metal band from Sweden and I’ve been friends with some of the members for years now. The band decided to record a cover of Killswitch Engage’s song The end of heartache, as a way to thank them for all the years of inspiration.

Rigging

Christian (guitar) setting up the mic for Lenny (vocals) in the studio.

The band wanted a video which documents the recording process in the studio and I wanted to give it a shot. A full day in the studio, and everything ran smoothly, probably because we all decided and agreed on the look and feel of the video beforehand. We decided to go for a grainy black and white, somewhat faded video, since the word “nostalgia” popped up a lot when I asked the band about their connection with the song. I shot the video in (FLAT) colour just in case the black and white feel would be a disaster and so I had to prep for this before hitting REC. The studio is very rustic and has a nice homely feel to it so I went with warm lights and tones. The point of the video was to show the love and respect Sins In Vain all have for the cover they were about to record. If I wanted them to look hard as hell and stone cold, I would have gone with a more blue and cold setup. But remember, black and white was always the main goal for the video, the decisions with the colourtemp was just precautionary planning.

Hey ho let's go!

Anders, Christian, Lenny and Jens toasting while Tommy is off rigging his drums.

A cosy studio usually comes with a lot of extra stuff (this one came with a rocking horse attached to the ceiling), and stuff casts shadows. Lighting the studio was a bit tricky so I often directed my redheads away from the subject, bouncing the 800W light off the ceiling instead. This way I eliminated many of the shadows which would have caused some confusion in the shots. I used vintage constructionlights to separate the subjects a bit from the background, and to add some quality to the cosy atmosphere I was going for. I didn’t use any makeup on the band because I wanted to capture the process in a raw and natural way. Some may argue that one should always use powder on subjects while working with hot lights, some don’t. We went raw and I personally think it adds to the “realness” of the video.

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A quick walk-through of the lighting approach used for this video.

The video was shoot with my trusty Canon 700D and I alternated between two prime lenses. The classic 50mm f1.8 and my latest addition, 24mm f2.8. The 24mm lens gives you a shot which is close to what you see from your own point of view  so composing your shot is quite easy since you kind of get, “what you see” from where you stand. The 50mm brings you closer as you probably know and is great for more emotional closeups. I kept the shots stable and consistent always using a tripod or a 60 cm slider. Not going handheld forced me to focus on creating a good composition before each take, keeping the rule of thirds in mind whenever possible. I did shoot some handheld B-roll I labeled “goofing around in the studio”. The plan was to let these images slip into the video towards the end, but while editing it just didn’t match the overall feel I was going for. Instead I used some of those shots in the intro for the video accompanied by sounds captured while setting everything up.

Setup

The Canon 700D running on the Magic Lantern firmware with matte-box and a 50mm f1.8 prime lens. Videotripod with fluid head for smooth tilting while filming.

The camera was running on Magic Lanterns firmware. This enabled me to view the shots with bars. I love shooting with bars. They are not permanent but it’s another safety when it comes to editing. You compose your image to match the bars but they’re not there on the actual footage. When you add bars in post you have more control over the image and are able to reframe your footage. Before Magic Lantern (which also lets you shoot in RAW if you wish) I used masking tape on the viewfinder where I wanted the bars.

I’m not going to write a full report on how I edited the video but I had lots of footage to choose from. I shot three takes of each member (Wide tripod / Close tripod / Slider) except Tommy on the drums who got two extra slider-takes to capture the footwork from both directions. The video drops on Valentines day, but until then you can watch the three promo videos below which I put together for the bands Instagram.

Curious about the music? Listen to Sins In Vain on Spotify

Jack & the jollybeans – Posterdrop.

Animation, Film, Photoshop, Projectionmapping

Our latest animated project is an adaptation of the classic fairytale Jack and the beanstalk. The film is a part of a larger projectionmapping project in school and for our final showing it will be projected onto a miniature set which I built in my studio. We won’t be releasing the film just yet since we want to see if we can get it selected for the 2018 Pixel filmfestival, but I’ll be posting a video of our set and some of the projections soon. Until then I wanted to share the poster which I created for our film. You can follow the entire process on our instagram sketchbook found here.

pOSTER UPDATED

FALCON II – Making a movie in 24 hours.

Film, Photoshop

Noomaraton is the largest film contest in Sweden and is held on the first Saturday in September each year. You register a team and on competition day every team involved gets the same criteria for making their movie. The competition starts at 09.00 a.m and ends 24 hours later. By then your film must be ready and uploaded if you want to stay in the competition. The rules are the same each year; maximum four crew members who work on the film (actors not included), one theme, three objects and three locations which must be in the movie. This year we got the following:

  • Theme – Reinforced reality
  • Objects – Flashlight, dice and stapler
  • Locations – Dining spot, snapchat and (town)square

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We knew from the start that we didn’t want to make a film which is safe and politically correct. We wanted to make the film we wanted to see and enjoy. So we went full 1980’s and completly overboard in the process. America vs. Russia, nuclear threat, training/final shootout montage, witty puns and punchlines, terrible subtitling and a (male) washed up hero of few words. Usually the films which win are the ones with a somewhat safe story so we’re not really counting on making it to the finals with this one, but we are very happy with the result.

Production was fun, stressful and tiring, just as expected. Here’s what our day looked like:

  • 09.00 – 11.00 – Screenplay
  • 11.00 – 12.00 – Props and costumes
  • 12.00 – 18.00 – Shooting scenes
  • 20.00 – 05.00 – Post production

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We all love this little short so much that we’re thinking of making a proper short with the concept. Actors Lille Peter Jönsson (Falcon) and Jonny Blomkvist (Petrov Wodka) are dying to see some more action, and a few other interesting Malmö-based actors are lined up if Falcon III makes it to production.

FALCON2

The screening of FALCON II is taking place at Panora cinema in Malmö on Tuesday (September 12th) and the doors open at 17.30. Two films from each region make it to the finals in Stockholm. We’re not counting on it, but then again, stranger things have happened. As soon as FALCON II is out of competition I’ll put it up online.

(FALCON (I) has not been made yet, we’re still waiting for Hollywood to call.)

HAPPY WIFE FILMS 2017 CREW:

  • Director: Casper Jarmo
  • Cinematography: Robin Jansson
  • Setwizardry/Still photography: Amanda Nilsson
  • Audio recording: Christian Andersen
  • Actors: Lille Peter Jönsson & Jonny Blomkvist

falcon 2

Posterwork: Casper Jarmo – Photography: Amanda Nilsson

To see the film follow this link.

 

 

The Tim Timmey interview.

Film

I’ve known Tim for quite some time. We grew up in the same area in the 90’s and were both into skateboarding, rollerblading and streetart. Even if we never really hung out (Tim’s a bit older than me and was always better at the above mentioned activities) I enjoyed being around him when we happened to be in the same spots.

In early 2000 we sometimes bumped into each other at parties of mutual friends. He’s always been there in some weird roundabout way and I’ve always looked up to him – he’s just a cool, playful really nice guy.

When I found out he was going to paint one of the big walls for ArtstreetHbg I was quite excited to be able to watch him paint again and it reminded me about my early teenage years. Tim was the artist I spent the most time documenting and we had some really nice days together, him painting, me shooting him. Below is a short bonusvideo from the second day of the festival of Tim working away on his mural.

Due to timepressure, this interview sadly never got any English subtitles. Sorry ’bout that.

This interview was made for the ArtstreetHBG project and if you’re interested in how I set up and planned the whole interview (tech-wise and editing) you can read about it here.

If you find Tim to be just as interesting as I do, give him a follow on his instagram.

Our short drops on Sunday, and here’s the trailer.

Film

We decided it’s time to set our short film “Mitt hjärta jublar” (My heart rejoices) free. So this Sunday, we’re putting a link up for anyone who’s interested in watching 12 minutes of misery, accompanied by a gorgeous original soundtrack composed by Therese Jarmo and Christian Andersen.

The movie entered this years Pixel film festival (at Ystad studios, Swe) but never won any prize. I wrote this film together with Robin Jansson (who also did the camerawork and loads of editing) and it was the first thing we did together from start to finish. Here’s the trailer:

The film is in Swedish, with English subtitles. Full cast and credits on imdb.com.