Gåsebäck gets its own beer! (And it’s way limited)

Illustrator, Photoshop

It must have been several years ago since Micke Hagström first coined the name for an imaginary beer with connections to my favourite spot in town called Gåsebäck. This is the place where we shot our webseries Fredagsmys, and beer was a big piece of that puzzle. We tried to push a bit for it but nothing really happened. It stayed an unrealized dream for a while longer.

During the performance-art spectacle “En safari i smutsen” I sent out invites in beerbottles labeled “Gåsebärs” (Goosebrew) which had to be smashed in order to get the invite out.

Recently I came into contact with a local brewery thanks to a friend with good ears. She mentioned the idea to Helsingborgs Benchwarmers Brewing Co and they gave me the chance to come up with the design. Quickly I might add. The beer is a citra hop IPA, and I wanted to incorporate that into the colors of the design. I didn’t want to go down the obvious route and put a big goose on the lable (Gåsebäck roughly translates to “Gooscreek”). Instead I wanted to mirror the underground art and culture which resides in Gåsebäck. The area sometimes gives me the occasional DDR-vibes, so I tried to remember how some of the German beerbottles in my grandpas basement used to look.

I used Adobe Dimension to create a mockup for the ad and went all in with ice, splashes and condensation.

The beer will only be available during a local festival at Gåsebäck 14th – 16th of June. It’s a limited edition of 300 cans, after that, they’re gone. Designing a beerlabel has been on my bucketlist for quite some time now and even if this one doesn’t hit the stores, I’ve got a feeling the next one just might. Let’s just say this put something in motion…

This cheesy poster will hopefully get the festivalgoers thirsty enough to try it out.

Thanks for staying with me, and a big thank you to RAW Print & Design for making this happen on such short notice!

THE OSLO JOB – PT. III/III

Stencils

First of all, let me just say that we pulled this one off. There were so many factors in play during this job and time was probably the one at the top. We didn’t really know anything but the sizes off the walls in the restaurant / bar we were hired to paint. Will the establishment be shut down during the paint job? Will there be enough room to cut our stencils? Will our projected stencils work? Do we have time to fix any stencils that are off? Is there time?

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The answer is, there is never enough time, no matter what you do if you’re doing what you love. We began driving up to Norway in a snowstorm early in the morning and arrived in the afternoon. It turned out that Nydalen Bryggeri & Spiseri was expanding and opening up another floor with a dedicated game / hangout /barsection, and this was the area we were painting. What we didn’t know was that we would be sharing it with a crew of carpenters. The electricians would come on Monday, and so would the lights. We were stuck with two portable construction-lights over the weekend. But something is better than nothing right? We dove right in. We cut the stencils lying down on the floor with workers buzzing around us.

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Before we went to bed around 1 am on day one, we had already finished the first wall. It was hard, since we spent half the day in a car focusing on the snowy road, but it was a massive psychological win, and we needed an estimate on how fast we could get a wall done.

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Since living costs are really high in Norway, we planned on eating “real food” once a day at the hotel breakfast (included with our stay). We stuck with the plan and survived on rye-bread, spreadable cheese and protein-puddings which we brought with us from Sweden. Our work nourished us. That, and perhaps a glass of wine or two before bed.

 

We spent three nights in Oslo and didn’t really see anything but floor, walls, ass-cracks and breakfast. In our short stay we worked a total of 43 hours each, and managed to clean up and pack just after midnight on Sunday evening. The sleep we had was dreamless. Mind non-existent. We were dead as doornails before we even hit the pillow each night. Every six hours we would brush our teeth and pretend we were getting ready for a normal days work, to trick the mind that we hadn’t already just worked for six or twelve hours a minute ago.

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Since I snore once in a blue moon, we turned our single room into a double, using the toilet.

And finally, when the last wall was done, it was worth every single second. A few days after coming home we got the feedback; both client and designer are pleased, everything a-ok. Total win. Below are the walls from our final evening in Nydalen.

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Curious about how we prepared for this job? Here are parts I and II of the Oslo job.

Photos by Therese Jarmo.

 

The Tony Rissla album.

Illustration, Photoshop

Today the album “Allt som inte dödar” by Tony Rissla was released today. This is a homegrown, self-produced creative album and features guest artists such as Fredricoz Fredricoz, Carolina Särnefält and old-school rap-legend Dogge Doggelito (The Latin Kings).

My contribution to this album was the artwork, which was covered in this previous post. Curious about how it sounds? Give it a try here.

The Oslo job – PT. I/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping

Before life was as complex as it is right now my sister and I used to paint together under the name Brohemia. Things were going quite well towards the end but as you all know, things happen (good and bad) and we just didn’t have the same time and freedom as we used to. We still did some jobs here and there but not like before. The funny thing is, Brohemia is always there, lurking in the dark like an old friendly demon you catch up with now and then – or actually, it kind of catches you. This time completely off guard.

Our old friend Peter Brobäck who started up addmorecolors.com (and turned it into a goldmine) just appeared out of nowhere, as he always does, with a massive job in hand. And as always, it was too good to pass up. So me and my sister are once again getting the spray cans, razors and markers ready for what will be the biggest job we’ve landed so far. We’re painting four walls, in an old industrial building turned into a restaurant/bar. In Oslo, Norway.

We decided to go with Brohemia. Vi like the style and the sense of humour in the images. I don’t want to put too many guidelines down, but if they could include some beer, industrial workers and humour into the designs I’d be very happy.” – The client
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 Dreamjob! And a very generous paycheck. But with a great paycheck comes great responsibility as Spiderman would say if he ran a business. We began with a moodboard.
My sister and I drew up some sketches over a cup of coffee and we very absolutely buzzing with excitement. We’ve taken lots of inspiration from WW2 propaganda posters in the past (the USSR had some amazing artists didn’t they?) and this time was no exception. This is what our sketches looked like a couple of hours into our coffee.
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After locking down our ideas I digitalized our ideas and sent them off to the agency. A week later we got the feedback. A few minor changes here and there (add local logo etc.) but all in all, we’re good to go. Here are the digitalized sketches.
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Our next step will be the creation of the actual stencils. Since they’re massive, we can’t print them like we used to (the cost of printing would eat up our entire budget) so our plan is to project them onto papers in a large room and trace the images in the correct size with markers. And that’s something I’ll document for the second blog post.
Stay trippy! 😉