Gåsebäck gets its own beer! (And it’s way limited)

Illustrator, Photoshop

It must have been several years ago since Micke Hagström first coined the name for an imaginary beer with connections to my favourite spot in town called Gåsebäck. This is the place where we shot our webseries Fredagsmys, and beer was a big piece of that puzzle. We tried to push a bit for it but nothing really happened. It stayed an unrealized dream for a while longer.

During the performance-art spectacle “En safari i smutsen” I sent out invites in beerbottles labeled “Gåsebärs” (Goosebrew) which had to be smashed in order to get the invite out.

Recently I came into contact with a local brewery thanks to a friend with good ears. She mentioned the idea to Helsingborgs Benchwarmers Brewing Co and they gave me the chance to come up with the design. Quickly I might add. The beer is a citra hop IPA, and I wanted to incorporate that into the colors of the design. I didn’t want to go down the obvious route and put a big goose on the lable (Gåsebäck roughly translates to “Gooscreek”). Instead I wanted to mirror the underground art and culture which resides in Gåsebäck. The area sometimes gives me the occasional DDR-vibes, so I tried to remember how some of the German beerbottles in my grandpas basement used to look.

I used Adobe Dimension to create a mockup for the ad and went all in with ice, splashes and condensation.

The beer will only be available during a local festival at Gåsebäck 14th – 16th of June. It’s a limited edition of 300 cans, after that, they’re gone. Designing a beerlabel has been on my bucketlist for quite some time now and even if this one doesn’t hit the stores, I’ve got a feeling the next one just might. Let’s just say this put something in motion…

This cheesy poster will hopefully get the festivalgoers thirsty enough to try it out.

Thanks for staying with me, and a big thank you to RAW Print & Design for making this happen on such short notice!

The Demtones may sound retro – but they’re not retired yet!

Photography, Photoshop

I’ve been raving about The Demtones ever since they first hired me to design a logo for them. We’re further down the road now and I wanted to show you a few photos I got during the videoshoot for “What you got to lose”. The video was shot and directed by MW visual media and parts of it, in a set dressed as a room where a grandma would feel at home.

The video for “What you got to lose” was shot at the old direstation, Gåsebäck.

I really dig the sound coming from these guys and it goes hand in hand with my passion for retro colorpalettes and designs. These images serve as social media content and pressimages.

Curious about the video? Check it out here!

The Tony Rissla album.

Illustration, Photoshop

Today the album “Allt som inte dödar” by Tony Rissla was released today. This is a homegrown, self-produced creative album and features guest artists such as Fredricoz Fredricoz, Carolina Särnefält and old-school rap-legend Dogge Doggelito (The Latin Kings).

My contribution to this album was the artwork, which was covered in this previous post. Curious about how it sounds? Give it a try here.

THE OSLO JOB – PT. II/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping, Stencils

I’ve spent the past three Saturdays with my sister tracing the stencils for our upcoming paint job in Oslo. As I mentioned in part one, printing these stencils would eat up our entire budget. So we projected them onto paper and traced the designs with permanent markers. We’ve never tried this technique before but we instantly fell in love with it. The upside of tracing stencils instead of printing them, is that can’t avoid mentally cutting, layering and painting them as you go. I guess you could say that this is the ultimate way of priming yourself for a big session when working with stencils.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We’ve known the wall-sizes for a couple of weeks, but it’s not until you actually see the size of the paper you’re tracing your image onto, that you realize how big these stencils actually are. We’ve never painted stencils this big and seeing the designs right in front of you is quite a breathtaking (and sinking) feeling, partly because you know in the back of your head that each layer must align with the other. It’s easy to get lost in the image because you’re up close a lot with the markers. The resolution wasn’t that great at times so some details got a bit blurry. Smartphone with the design equals handy helper.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

One of our designs pictures three workers protesting in a bar. The thought is to convey ideas of unity between workers (and people), and that you can take pride in working hard (but being off having a beer is better). We wanted signs so that we could create actual signs out of cardboard and glue them to the wall. This to make the design pop a bit, and frankly, it’s always more fun to work with different materials and textures when creating art. We used three different fonts to sell the idea that the people in the design actually made their own signs. We had a fun time sinking into the minds of the different characters. The Nick Cave-looking drunk who just showed up for the beer, the woman who wasn’t to bothered with her A’s, and the proud butcher who took the time masking his frame the proper way, with tape, putting all his effort into writing the word NO.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“Damn it Martha! All they need to see is the word NO! That says it all! The rest is just jibber-jabber. I’m not a signmaker I’m a butcher! I always write my prices large when I advertise my meat. At least I used tape when masking out my frame, not like the other two amateurs next to me who just slapped some paint on around the edges.”

The butcher to his wife (in our heads).

7

Since we’re painting in Norway, this dumb “Save the (wh)ales!” joke really brings it home.

All our stencils are rolled up, the paint is on its way and we’re mentally prepared to work long hours, go nuts and just have fun. So far we’re confident it will all work out fine. Let’s hope we’re right. Otherwise we’ll ruin four walls in a bar in Oslo and come home broke.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

The Tony Rissla cover.

Illustration, Photoshop

Sometimes fun jobs appear by chance. This was a very spontaneous quicke for Tony Rissla which landed on my lap via Facebook. He sent over a sketch of his vision (sometimes the simple sketches are the clearest) and I fell for the idea.

b1

“Two dudes with hoodies, nothing but black inside. One is holding a joint, the other a can of beer. And then a big crying moon in the background. In a park. Keep it depressing.” – Tony Rissla

I’ve been quite busy animating for a while so I really enjoyed pulling out the inkbottles and fountainpen. I decided to do colouring in Photoshop to have full control over the tones (I knew Tony wanted the cover in colour, but I thought I’ll give him the chance to change his mind). After scanning the illustration I used high resolution watercolour images and blended / masked them out in the right places.

b2

We decided to do the titles by hand so I drew up a set of styles and scanned them as well. This was a really quick job all in all but I really enjoyed it since it gave me a break from the screens. It’s so nice to just play around with ink, especially when it ammounts to something people enjoy and make use of. Tony decided to go with the fully coloured version while I’m more a fan of the one with moon and bench in colour.

Which one do you prefer?

Cover_prick

Curious about the music? Check out Tony Rissla on Spotify and Soundcloud.

Make your portraits stand out.

Photography, Photoshop

Yesterday I tried a new approach to facial lighting while shooting portraits. I wanted to bring out the beast in my model so I decided to give scissorlighting a shot, and I think it turned out great. This is not a standard approach when it comes to setting up your lights but in this case I think it worked quite well. For this technique you’ll need two sources of hard light, I used my 800W redheads. The photo was shot with a Canon 700D using the 50mm f1.8 lens (wide open) and a .3 ND filter.

The idea is to shine the light on the sides of the face, slightly from the back of your model. The model is placed in the center where the two lights cross. Here’s a sketch:

saxaskiss

I shot my portraits in RAW so I had a lot of wiggle room in Photoshop. Which light setup is your favourite when lighting for portraits? Drop me a comment – I’d love to know.

Model Marcus Witold Piorkowski is a talented musician and filmmaker. You can check out his portfolio here and listen to his music on Spotify.