Limited edition T-shirt – 1970’s palette.

Illustration, Illustrator

A while back I finally grabbed the bull by the horns and started to get a grip on Adobe Illustrator. I’ve been relying on Photoshop for so long now and it’s time I learnt how to properly create custom logos, illustrations and printable vectordesigns. I’m really enjoying it and one of my designs is up for grabs on a T-shirt.

The shirt is only for sale for 21 days (19 days left as I post this) and after that, it’s gone for good. The shirt is 15£ (+shipping) and the design is printed on high quality fabrics ranging from S to XXL. Available in black, white or a gorgeous golden colour I picked to match my design. Get ’em while they’re hot!

  • You can buy the shirt here.

Shirt facts: 100% Ringspun cotton pre-shrunk jersey knit. 90% Ringspun cotton, 10% Polyester

 

The Tony Rissla album.

Illustration, Photoshop

Today the album “Allt som inte dödar” by Tony Rissla was released today. This is a homegrown, self-produced creative album and features guest artists such as Fredricoz Fredricoz, Carolina Särnefält and old-school rap-legend Dogge Doggelito (The Latin Kings).

My contribution to this album was the artwork, which was covered in this previous post. Curious about how it sounds? Give it a try here.

THE OSLO JOB – PT. II/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping, Stencils

I’ve spent the past three Saturdays with my sister tracing the stencils for our upcoming paint job in Oslo. As I mentioned in part one, printing these stencils would eat up our entire budget. So we projected them onto paper and traced the designs with permanent markers. We’ve never tried this technique before but we instantly fell in love with it. The upside of tracing stencils instead of printing them, is that can’t avoid mentally cutting, layering and painting them as you go. I guess you could say that this is the ultimate way of priming yourself for a big session when working with stencils.

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We’ve known the wall-sizes for a couple of weeks, but it’s not until you actually see the size of the paper you’re tracing your image onto, that you realize how big these stencils actually are. We’ve never painted stencils this big and seeing the designs right in front of you is quite a breathtaking (and sinking) feeling, partly because you know in the back of your head that each layer must align with the other. It’s easy to get lost in the image because you’re up close a lot with the markers. The resolution wasn’t that great at times so some details got a bit blurry. Smartphone with the design equals handy helper.

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One of our designs pictures three workers protesting in a bar. The thought is to convey ideas of unity between workers (and people), and that you can take pride in working hard (but being off having a beer is better). We wanted signs so that we could create actual signs out of cardboard and glue them to the wall. This to make the design pop a bit, and frankly, it’s always more fun to work with different materials and textures when creating art. We used three different fonts to sell the idea that the people in the design actually made their own signs. We had a fun time sinking into the minds of the different characters. The Nick Cave-looking drunk who just showed up for the beer, the woman who wasn’t to bothered with her A’s, and the proud butcher who took the time masking his frame the proper way, with tape, putting all his effort into writing the word NO.

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“Damn it Martha! All they need to see is the word NO! That says it all! The rest is just jibber-jabber. I’m not a signmaker I’m a butcher! I always write my prices large when I advertise my meat. At least I used tape when masking out my frame, not like the other two amateurs next to me who just slapped some paint on around the edges.”

The butcher to his wife (in our heads).

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Since we’re painting in Norway, this dumb “Save the (wh)ales!” joke really brings it home.

All our stencils are rolled up, the paint is on its way and we’re mentally prepared to work long hours, go nuts and just have fun. So far we’re confident it will all work out fine. Let’s hope we’re right. Otherwise we’ll ruin four walls in a bar in Oslo and come home broke.

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The Tony Rissla cover.

Illustration, Photoshop

Sometimes fun jobs appear by chance. This was a very spontaneous quicke for Tony Rissla which landed on my lap via Facebook. He sent over a sketch of his vision (sometimes the simple sketches are the clearest) and I fell for the idea.

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“Two dudes with hoodies, nothing but black inside. One is holding a joint, the other a can of beer. And then a big crying moon in the background. In a park. Keep it depressing.” – Tony Rissla

I’ve been quite busy animating for a while so I really enjoyed pulling out the inkbottles and fountainpen. I decided to do colouring in Photoshop to have full control over the tones (I knew Tony wanted the cover in colour, but I thought I’ll give him the chance to change his mind). After scanning the illustration I used high resolution watercolour images and blended / masked them out in the right places.

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We decided to do the titles by hand so I drew up a set of styles and scanned them as well. This was a really quick job all in all but I really enjoyed it since it gave me a break from the screens. It’s so nice to just play around with ink, especially when it ammounts to something people enjoy and make use of. Tony decided to go with the fully coloured version while I’m more a fan of the one with moon and bench in colour.

Which one do you prefer?

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Curious about the music? Check out Tony Rissla on Spotify and Soundcloud.

The Oslo job – PT. I/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping

Before life was as complex as it is right now my sister and I used to paint together under the name Brohemia. Things were going quite well towards the end but as you all know, things happen (good and bad) and we just didn’t have the same time and freedom as we used to. We still did some jobs here and there but not like before. The funny thing is, Brohemia is always there, lurking in the dark like an old friendly demon you catch up with now and then – or actually, it kind of catches you. This time completely off guard.

Our old friend Peter Brobäck who started up addmorecolors.com (and turned it into a goldmine) just appeared out of nowhere, as he always does, with a massive job in hand. And as always, it was too good to pass up. So me and my sister are once again getting the spray cans, razors and markers ready for what will be the biggest job we’ve landed so far. We’re painting four walls, in an old industrial building turned into a restaurant/bar. In Oslo, Norway.

We decided to go with Brohemia. Vi like the style and the sense of humour in the images. I don’t want to put too many guidelines down, but if they could include some beer, industrial workers and humour into the designs I’d be very happy.” – The client
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 Dreamjob! And a very generous paycheck. But with a great paycheck comes great responsibility as Spiderman would say if he ran a business. We began with a moodboard.
My sister and I drew up some sketches over a cup of coffee and we very absolutely buzzing with excitement. We’ve taken lots of inspiration from WW2 propaganda posters in the past (the USSR had some amazing artists didn’t they?) and this time was no exception. This is what our sketches looked like a couple of hours into our coffee.
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After locking down our ideas I digitalized our ideas and sent them off to the agency. A week later we got the feedback. A few minor changes here and there (add local logo etc.) but all in all, we’re good to go. Here are the digitalized sketches.
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Our next step will be the creation of the actual stencils. Since they’re massive, we can’t print them like we used to (the cost of printing would eat up our entire budget) so our plan is to project them onto papers in a large room and trace the images in the correct size with markers. And that’s something I’ll document for the second blog post.
Stay trippy! 😉

The deadly bandits – Animating the dead.

Animation, Film, Illustration, Photoshop

For film class we were asked to create a short (about 40 seconds long) video in After Effects of an anthropomorphic band performing a tune in 2.5D space. The video should contain some camera movement through a layered world of our own creation. Teaming up for this one was easy.

Amanda Nilsson and myself (Bad Apple Films) hooked up with Leon Remstedt and Daniel Sjöberg (Woodland Films) and spent a good minute on agreeing that something must be dead, and something must die. The story pretty much wrote itself. We knew we wanted a concept similar to Disney’s The Skeleton Dance (1929), and we knew we would have to come up with a grim way to abruptly end the song after about 30 seconds.

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Kevin MacLeod’s “One-eyed maestro” is 1:58 long – we needed it to be about 0:40. Easy fix.

Since we went with animal skulls instead of heads we had to pick animals with skulls that differ from each other. Que a cow, vulture and a crocodile. Amanda, Daniel and me animated a musician each while Leon animated the background. After a few days we met up and put the whole composition together over two days and added camera movement and sound effects.

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Original drafts and sketches for “Rojaz”, “Nevada” and “Diego” with their instruments.

Even though the animation tends to get a bit stiff when animating cut-out’s, it does add a quirky charm to your video. And if you haven’t played around with the built-in camera in After Effects i strongly recommend you try it out. It’s actually less complicated than one might think. Thanks for watching!

Dutzie the drunk – All you need is beer.

Animation, Film, Illustration

For our lip sync assignment we had to record some audio to begin with. We were told to ask random people the question; “What is love?” After picking out the best answer we were told to listen to the audio, and listen hard.

“What type of animal does the voice you recorded sound like and where is it?”

After asking Christian Andersen we knew it was going to head in a somewhat darker direction. A rabbit-like creature, trying to look real mean and hard, but with a inside of melted fudge just waiting to pour out of that thin, tired shell of a body. Dutzie was born.

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This was the first sketch made on the train home from school.

Obviously Dutzie was in a bar throwing back some nice crispy (lukewarm and stale) brew – through a straw. Since he is trying so hard – but still is quite helpless and small. We added the fly since, (as always) something must die. Blood must be spilled. The fly also gave us a reason to play around a bit more with Dutzie’s eyes and the audio (the buzzing of the fly in relation to the microphone in the film).

Instead of eye-brows we used whiskers and ears because a true oddball needs to have big dumb eyes and nothing around the eyes, but wrinkles. And eyes. So much eyes. Eyes eyes and eyes. Oddball – Eyeball. This is science at it’s finest. We spent a whole day on lip syncing using about 12 different sets of mouths – and another 5 days just adding life to the character and the surroundings.

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This was the first time for both Amanda and me working with Adobe Animate (or any type of animation for that matter) so I’m sure we could have gone a bit faster on a relatively small animation like this – if it wasn’t for the fact that we figured every single step out as we went along. This tutorial was amazing.

We fell in love with Dutzie – so we even printed T-shirts. And others seemed to like him too. This animation landed us a music video job we’ll be working on over the summer together. So stay tuned, because we’re not done yet.

 

 

Dutzie Posterdrop.

Film, Illustration, Photoshop

One day left in school – with two projects left which will be presented tomorrow. In our three week animation course we produced two shorts, one made in Animate (former Flash) and one in After Effects. I will be putting both of them up here tomorrow but for now I’ll settle for the poster for our lip sync animation “Dutzie”, voiced by Christian Andersen.

Dutzie poster