Limited edition T-shirt – 1970’s palette.

Illustration, Illustrator

A while back I finally grabbed the bull by the horns and started to get a grip on Adobe Illustrator. I’ve been relying on Photoshop for so long now and it’s time I learnt how to properly create custom logos, illustrations and printable vectordesigns. I’m really enjoying it and one of my designs is up for grabs on a T-shirt.

The shirt is only for sale for 21 days (19 days left as I post this) and after that, it’s gone for good. The shirt is 15£ (+shipping) and the design is printed on high quality fabrics ranging from S to XXL. Available in black, white or a gorgeous golden colour I picked to match my design. Get ’em while they’re hot!

  • You can buy the shirt here.

Shirt facts: 100% Ringspun cotton pre-shrunk jersey knit. 90% Ringspun cotton, 10% Polyester

 

The Tony Rissla album.

Illustration, Photoshop

Today the album “Allt som inte dödar” by Tony Rissla was released today. This is a homegrown, self-produced creative album and features guest artists such as Fredricoz Fredricoz, Carolina Särnefält and old-school rap-legend Dogge Doggelito (The Latin Kings).

My contribution to this album was the artwork, which was covered in this previous post. Curious about how it sounds? Give it a try here.

THE OSLO JOB – PT. II/III

Illustration, Photoshop, Projectionmapping, Stencils

I’ve spent the past three Saturdays with my sister tracing the stencils for our upcoming paint job in Oslo. As I mentioned in part one, printing these stencils would eat up our entire budget. So we projected them onto paper and traced the designs with permanent markers. We’ve never tried this technique before but we instantly fell in love with it. The upside of tracing stencils instead of printing them, is that can’t avoid mentally cutting, layering and painting them as you go. I guess you could say that this is the ultimate way of priming yourself for a big session when working with stencils.

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We’ve known the wall-sizes for a couple of weeks, but it’s not until you actually see the size of the paper you’re tracing your image onto, that you realize how big these stencils actually are. We’ve never painted stencils this big and seeing the designs right in front of you is quite a breathtaking (and sinking) feeling, partly because you know in the back of your head that each layer must align with the other. It’s easy to get lost in the image because you’re up close a lot with the markers. The resolution wasn’t that great at times so some details got a bit blurry. Smartphone with the design equals handy helper.

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One of our designs pictures three workers protesting in a bar. The thought is to convey ideas of unity between workers (and people), and that you can take pride in working hard (but being off having a beer is better). We wanted signs so that we could create actual signs out of cardboard and glue them to the wall. This to make the design pop a bit, and frankly, it’s always more fun to work with different materials and textures when creating art. We used three different fonts to sell the idea that the people in the design actually made their own signs. We had a fun time sinking into the minds of the different characters. The Nick Cave-looking drunk who just showed up for the beer, the woman who wasn’t to bothered with her A’s, and the proud butcher who took the time masking his frame the proper way, with tape, putting all his effort into writing the word NO.

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“Damn it Martha! All they need to see is the word NO! That says it all! The rest is just jibber-jabber. I’m not a signmaker I’m a butcher! I always write my prices large when I advertise my meat. At least I used tape when masking out my frame, not like the other two amateurs next to me who just slapped some paint on around the edges.”

The butcher to his wife (in our heads).

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Since we’re painting in Norway, this dumb “Save the (wh)ales!” joke really brings it home.

All our stencils are rolled up, the paint is on its way and we’re mentally prepared to work long hours, go nuts and just have fun. So far we’re confident it will all work out fine. Let’s hope we’re right. Otherwise we’ll ruin four walls in a bar in Oslo and come home broke.

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The Tony Rissla cover.

Illustration, Photoshop

Sometimes fun jobs appear by chance. This was a very spontaneous quicke for Tony Rissla which landed on my lap via Facebook. He sent over a sketch of his vision (sometimes the simple sketches are the clearest) and I fell for the idea.

b1

“Two dudes with hoodies, nothing but black inside. One is holding a joint, the other a can of beer. And then a big crying moon in the background. In a park. Keep it depressing.” – Tony Rissla

I’ve been quite busy animating for a while so I really enjoyed pulling out the inkbottles and fountainpen. I decided to do colouring in Photoshop to have full control over the tones (I knew Tony wanted the cover in colour, but I thought I’ll give him the chance to change his mind). After scanning the illustration I used high resolution watercolour images and blended / masked them out in the right places.

b2

We decided to do the titles by hand so I drew up a set of styles and scanned them as well. This was a really quick job all in all but I really enjoyed it since it gave me a break from the screens. It’s so nice to just play around with ink, especially when it ammounts to something people enjoy and make use of. Tony decided to go with the fully coloured version while I’m more a fan of the one with moon and bench in colour.

Which one do you prefer?

Cover_prick

Curious about the music? Check out Tony Rissla on Spotify and Soundcloud.