How I set up the Jimmy Skize interview.

DIY-builds and hacks, Film

This interview was made for the municipality of Helsingborg and their streetart festival “ArtstreetHBG”.

Jimmy Skize is a graffiti-veteran who fell in love with graffiti in when the documentary Style Wars came out. He’s been involved in the art form ever since. This means he was painting when I still walked around in nappies. The interview is in Swedish and sadly I never got around to subtitle it. I’ve got four more interviews like this coming up and three of them will be in English.

So how did I set this up?

  • Canon 700D
  • Canon compact video camera
  • Redhead 800W Cinelight
  • RØDE videomic pro
  • Vintage construction-light
  • DIY cameraslider

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I had one camera on each side of my subject; one close up and one a bit further away. I positioned myself in the middle of these to make sure the subject wasn’t looking into any of the cameras. I used the construction-light behind my subject to separate him from the background a bit, and then I went for a Rembrandt-lighting with my 800w (45 degree angles from the subject X, Y, Z until the little triangle appears under the eye of the shaded half of the face).

I kept the interview kind of loose, like a conversation, but where I mainly nodded and smiled a lot instead of answering (since I cut my part of the chat out completely). I knew I was going to do these interviews, so during the festival I made sure I had some footage of each artist to edit into the interview. Also, I usually try to cut between cameras when I edit as my subject blinks. The closer camera is good to use for a bit of impact when it gets a bit more emotional or personal.

Since there would be a difference in picture quality using two different cameras, I planned to make the footage of the lesser camera black and white and add a vintage feel to it. That’s why I brought my old Super-8 camera to the studio and created a little intro for these interviews. It motivates the black and white, cropped, vintage footage a bit more. I used my slider and stabilized the footage with Premieres Warp Stabilizer and quite easily masked the lens where the text appears.

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The Super-8 camera (a RICOH SUPER-8) was never used for anything else than looking fly in the intro and to justify the look of the Canon compact videocamera.

Finally I took some portraits with my DSLR before letting my subject go since I had everything set up. These photos where later used as cover images for the videos, and for the bio-page of each artist.

Each interview went on for 25 minutes and was edited down to about 4 minutes. The intro was used in every interview and all I had to do was to change the name in the end for each artist.

Coming up during next week are: Ilse Weisfelt, Tim Timmey, Levi Jacobs and Spidertag.

 

 

7 days of streetart in under 7 minutes.

Film, Photography

This summer I’ve been working for Helsingborg documenting the graffitifestival “ArtstreetHBG” and street-theathre festival “Passage”. It’s been hectic and busy with full days of filming and late nights of editing video and photos. But now it’s all calming down a bit and I’ll be posting some of my latest stuff here. Here’s a video that sums up the graffitifestival quite well. If you’re interested in the other media I’ve produced for this festival it can be found here.

Our short drops on Sunday, and here’s the trailer.

Film

We decided it’s time to set our short film “Mitt hjärta jublar” (My heart rejoices) free. So this Sunday, we’re putting a link up for anyone who’s interested in watching 12 minutes of misery, accompanied by a gorgeous original soundtrack composed by Therese Jarmo and Christian Andersen.

The movie entered this years Pixel film festival (at Ystad studios, Swe) but never won any prize. I wrote this film together with Robin Jansson (who also did the camerawork and loads of editing) and it was the first thing we did together from start to finish. Here’s the trailer:

The film is in Swedish, with English subtitles. Full cast and credits on imdb.com.

Buildings left for dead spring to life.

Photography, Photoshop

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I just posted the photos I’ve been editing for quite some time since I came back from a day out in Helsingör (DK). The goal was to explore four more or less abandoned places; a home, a bowling alley, a hospital and an old museum. The photos that moved me the most came from the first to spots I mentioned. You can see all the photos in my portfolio here.

Doomey lakelife

Photography, Photoshop

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Yesterday I went to a lake in a small community called Hyllinge to get some better photos of a treehouse I Instagrammed about a year ago. I knew I was going for some black and white shots, mainly because of the doomey weather combined with the uneven angles of the treehouse. I thought the shot of the structure against the lake would be my best (and only) shot for the day (since Hyllinge isn’t the center of the visual world really), but I was lucky enough to catch a man fishing which turned out to be the better photo. As I left I noticed some flowers growing on the roof a little cabin, something you don’t see everyday. I felt lucky because this way I could shoot the flowers comfortably from below, catching some light in a different way than normally, and I even liked to colours enough to keep them. No matter what you’re planning, you just don’t know what you’ll end up with as you step out the door with a camera.

 

Got graffiti?

Photography, Photoshop

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I’m happy to finally add the edited shots I took at the old dairy factory about a week ago. This place was built in the 60’s and the building is gorgeous. It’s got a basement (now flooded), a main floor and a second floor. The building is huge, but every inch is covered in graffiti which has been building up for years. There are obviously people living there since the floor was covered in poop, both fresh and stale. As we snuck around the floors, making nothing but shuttersounds we heard footsteps (there’s glass everywhere) and loud breathing, quite creepy since you don’t really know who’s making those sounds. But judging from the traces people left there it ain’t Jehovah’s witnesses living in there. Amazing spot to say the least, both in and outside.